Potatoes: Keep It Simple

Potatoes, Plain and Simple

Potatoes, Plain and Simple

Listening to the most recent episode of NPR's Splendid Table, a nutritionist was describing what she considered to be remarkable differences in the amount of nutrition in torn lettuce vs. whole-leaf lettuce.  She talked about how steaming fruit draws out antioxidants.  She went into great length about the huge loss of nutrition with various cooking techniques.  

As if the problem with the Standard American Diet (SAD) is that we are steaming our peaches. 

As if the reason we are battling obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer at exorbitant rates is because we aren't tearing our lettuce. 

I still will often be asked, "What's more nutritious, sweet potatoes or white potatoes?"   

My response "Whichever one you will eat". 

The problem with our diet isn't that we're eating too many white potatoes or too many peeled potatoes.  The problem is that we are cutting those potato into either thin chips or skinny fries, blanching them once in oil to cook, then frying them a second time in hot fat to crisp up.  Then we toss them with a hefty amount of salt.  Or, if we're a fancy-pants chef, we load up with truffle oil, sour cream, bacon crumbles, or even cheese curds. We call it "gourmet" and slap a $10 price tag on it.   Then we dip it into our choice of sugary tomato syrup or fatty egg emulsion.The problem with our diet isn't that we're eating too many white potatoes or too many peeled potatoes.  The problem is that we are cutting that potato into either thin chips or skinny fries, blanching them once in oil to cook, then frying them a second time in hot fat to crisp up.  Then we toss them with a hefty amount of salt.  Or, if we're a fancy-pants chef, we load up with truffle oil, sour cream, bacon crumbles, or even cheese curds.  Then we dip it into our choice of sugary tomato syrup or fatty egg emulsion.  

Keep it simple.  The problem is not the potatoes.  Eat potatoes.  Just cut out all that other stuff that weighs you down. 

Try this recipe: Baked Chili Fries 

One medium Russet Potato is only 170 calories and packs:

16% Fiber, 9% Protein, 37 % Vitamin C, 27% Potassium, 10 % Iron

Plus, it's a good source of:  

Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Magnesium, and More